FAQs

You may want to contact your plan and ask if they will reinstate your coverage; however, if your coverage was terminated for not making the payment within the grace period, the plan is not required to reinstate your coverage.

Who pays for COBRA coverage?

Posted on Apr 14, 2015 in

Your group health plan can require you to pay for COBRA continuation coverage. The amount charged to qualified beneficiaries cannot exceed 102% of the cost to the plan for similarly situated individuals covered under the plan who have not incurred a qualifying event. In determining COBRA premiums, the plan can include the costs paid by ...
Read More Who pays for COBRA coverage?

Under COBRA, participants, covered spouses and dependent children may continue their plan coverage for a limited time when they would otherwise lose coverage due to a particular event, such as divorce (or legal separation). A covered employee’s spouse who would lose coverage due to a divorce may elect continuation coverage under the plan for a ...
Read More Is a divorced spouse entitled to COBRA coverage from their former spouses’ group health plan?

If you are entitled to an 18 month maximum period of continuation coverage, you may become eligible for an extension of the maximum time period in two circumstances. The first is when a qualified beneficiary is disabled; the second is when a second qualifying event occurs. Disability If any one of the qualified beneficiaries in ...
Read More Can I extend my COBRA continuation coverage?

A group health plan may terminate coverage earlier than the end of the maximum period for any of the following reasons: Premiums are not paid in full on a timely basis; The employer ceases to maintain any group health plan; A qualified beneficiary begins coverage under another group health plan after electing continuation coverage; A ...
Read More Can COBRA continuation coverage be terminated early for any reason?

How long does COBRA coverage last?

Posted on Apr 14, 2015 in

COBRA requires that continuation coverage extend from the date of the qualifying event for a limited period of 18 or 36 months. The length of time depends on the type of qualifying event that gave rise to the COBRA rights. When the qualifying event is the covered employees/retirees termination of employment or reduction in hours ...
Read More How long does COBRA coverage last?

If you elect continuation coverage, the coverage you are given must be identical to the coverage currently available under the plan to similarly situated employees/retirees and their families (generally, this is the same coverage that you had immediately before the qualifying event). You will also be entitled, while receiving continuation coverage, to the same benefits, ...
Read More Under COBRA, what benefits must be covered?

If you waive COBRA coverage during the election period, you will only be permitted to revoke your waiver of coverage and to elect continuation coverage as long as you do so within the 60 day election period. Then, the plan need only provide continuation coverage beginning on the date you revoke the waiver.

If you are entitled to elect COBRA coverage, you must be given an election period of at least 60 days to choose whether or not to elect continuation coverage.

Qualifying events eligible for COBRA continuation of coverage include: Death of a covered employee (if dependents not eligible for survivor benefits) Termination of employment for reasons other than gross misconduct Reduction in work hours Covered employee’s becoming entitled to Medicare Divorce or legal separation of a covered employee and spouse A child’s loss of dependent ...
Read More What are some examples of qualifying events?